First hand-pressed 22-D out of the mold

The first pressed clay is now out of the mold and she came out with a very minimal amount of surface defects that have to be fixed by hand. In the 1890s when these pieces were made the workers pounded the clay in using a small sand bag to ram the clay into the details and eliminate the little “creases” that I seem to get between pieces of clay laid in and pressed next to each other. Might help too if the clay was a little more moist and softer but I hesitate to add water since more water causes more shrinkage. To get a batch custom mixed to add a little more water I’d have to buy I believe a full ton and there’s an extra charge too.
Really want to see this in the red clay but I don’t have enough to do it and only had 50# of this white clay left.

NYC Astor Place Subway Beaver panel

Now I have the very first hand-pressed clay from the new plaster mold out and drying, it took 50# of clay to press the design, and about 10# of that was removed during the final work on it.

Now it will set loosely under plastic to slowly, evenly dry out over the next week to 10 days, it will need to be 100% dry before it can be fired in the kiln. I plan to press a second one either in the same white clay, or the red clay.

The photos show the progression from start to finish, with the back of the sculpture being made exactly the same way the antique original 19th century architectural ornaments were made, not really required for my pieces, but mostly it’s done out of tradition and authenticity.

 


I also did one in the red clay today;

 

Dramatic little cornice lion continued

Seeing how the lion head fits, the 11″ long backing form looks just right to show that nice classic double curve an inch or so on either side of the lion while keeping the whole thing small and compact .
I have to see if the boxes of clay I have had sitting around are still useable, but once I start making the clay backing form in the template box it all has to be done quickly, including making the complete rubber mold before the clay starts to shrink, including making the plaster support shell since if the clay shrinks the rubber will move with it, so the shell has to be done as soon as the last aplication of rubber is no longer tacky.
Right now I don’t have the molding plaster to make the shell.
Maybe next weekend I can form the clay backer if that clay is ok, and it will firm up a little over a week without shrinking, and then I’ll order what I need in 2-3 weeks and press the lion into the still soft clay and then make the rubber mold.

Dramatic little lion cornice

The template for the lion is done except for attaching the one side piece once I decided how wide the sculpture was going to be, after coming home and measuring the lions head and found it was 9″ wide, I decided on 11″ wide for the backing block, so just like they did the old plaster ceiling moldings this box and template is used the same way but on clay.
I have the 1st section of the little mold made, after it hardens I can mold on the next section, it will take 3, maybe 4 pieces.

Mold started of my lion mask
The mold is done and I made a cast in it to see how it looks, it can be used with the clay  backer formed and shaped with the template I made earlier.
Now I can take this and incorporate him into the new clay backer and while the plaster cast is still wet make a mold of the whole thing since the rubber I use is unaffected by moisture in the model.
This would have to be done on the moist clay once formed since clay shrinks as it dries and plaster does not.

I went ahead and shaped the clay backing block for the lion with the template box and just set the lion in it’s approximate position for the photos and then sealed it up in a plastic bag to keep it from drying too much too quickly, once the clay sort of firms up I can remove the sides of the box and finish and tool texture the 4 sides and the face nicely, and then look at setting the lion in and filling the gaps around the sides of it.

NYC subway eagle plaque S2

Since I have most of the 2 gallon kit of mold rubber left over that needs to be used up, I decided to set up this clay model I did in 2008 after an original polychromed terracotta at the 14th st subway station in Manhattan. A volunteer back then took several photos and obtained measurements for me to work with. The model has been kicking around in the studio, the basement and elsewhere around the house while I decided on how I wanted to do the molds.

Originally I was going to do 2 molds, as a one-piece panel, and as thinner tiles in terracotta. For now I’m going to caulk-in the seams to have it as a one-piece panel with the seams looking like mortar joints.

Setting up the model for the mold involves cutting a sheet of drywall in one piece to surround the assembly so I can raise/lower the drywall to get the final depth of what I want for the resulting castings’ thickness.
I wanted to keep as thin as practical to lessen the weight, but the lower tail fin section was thinner than I felt it should be, so I lowered the drywall down 1/2″ from where I originally thought it might go, that leaves the thinnest portion 1-1/2″ thick.
I started caulking in the seams between pieces to fill, but not obliterate them- so the liquid mold rubber can’t drizzle down through the spaces before it sets up.

Only the rubber portion will be done for now, the plaster support shell for this and the plaster mold for the beaver will have to wait until I order some of my casting material, molding plaster, and a few boxes of clay if they clay I have on hand is not usable (been sitting around for a couple of years it still dries out even in the unopened plastic bags)
It might be a month before I order that stuff since I still have 3 bags of casting material on hand and it all has to be freight shipped, so it’s about a $600 outlay for what I’ll want to order.

One of the original polychromed terracotta eagles at the 14th St platform.

“Converting” a model to pressed clay terracotta

Started on the positive mold of my beaver sculpture by bringing the negative mold up from the basement and applying the release agent to it, after I have dinner I’ll be applying the rubber compound.

The mold in progress, and just after the 2nd application of rubber started to gel I poured the warm plaster in for the support shell. The heat from the setting plaster will help cure the rubber faster too. To-morrow I can take the negative mold apart and peel that rubber off the new and I’ll have a rubber positive with this plaster support inside it.

After filling the cavity with plaster for support

And here’s the rubber positive to use for making the plaster piece-mold to press terracotta in.

 

Not much new lately

I haven’t posted anything here since last July, since there’s been very little happening sculpture wise, plenty of other non-sculpture stuff I’ve been very busy with though.

I took a break from doing any further new models since I have a bunch of completed clay models sitting all over and not even one inquiry on any of those, so I have not  made rubber molds of them and have no plans to do so in the foreseeable future. There’s not a lot of point in continuing to create large, fragile clay models and having them sit stored around the house where they are in the way and easily damaged.

We’ll see what happens this year.

Gallery building

I decided to put my gallery building up for sale and bring the contents back home.

After being open for 3 years I’ve found absolutely no interest, participation or much of anything from the residents of the city for the arts, history and culture the gallery/museum brought in.

Even the city’s “betterment’ group which for years has been yammering on and on about desperately wanting to bring new businesses into the town were completely and utterly silent the whole 3 years the gallery has been here, not even one line about it on their web site, not one resident of the town ever called or emailed asking to visit or take a tour, I may as well have opened a frog pond, it would have probably generated interest or something!

 

 

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

New hosting

After a fair amount of work I finally completed moving two domains and their associated web contents to different hosting that will save about $100 a year.

Other than that, there hasn’t been much to update, I’ve become busy with other projects and I’ve taken a break from making further models so I haven’t started the West Side Highway model beyond making the wood form for it. I might get started on that in a couple of weeks, we’ll see.

I’ve discontinued my mailing list which had only about 32 subscribers to it all these years anyway, other than Rick and maybe one other client, I never heard a peep from the others in years, so I figured most of the mails were going in the junk folders or they were no longer interested.

That’s about all that’s new for now!

West Side Highway model

I decided on the width of the model and I took the old photo I have and sized it proportionally in CAD, then I decided to experiment with making the sides “torn” so I could get a better idea the effect. I think with the right amount of “tear” texture it will be just what I had in mind.
Maybe adding about 50% more raggedness and rounding/curving the tear here and there on the clay model will do it, the CAD version is just a real quick/easy use of polygon hiding.

Oh and if anyone is wondering about the street name “Desbrosses” street and how it might be pronounced, this explanation from an 1880 book should do the trick:

In the city of New York there has been of very late years a remarkable change of name effected by this rule of spelling-book. “What,” said to me an elderly gentleman, a member of a highly respected old New York family, “what do these people mean by Dezbros-sez Street? There’s no such street. The name is De Broose Street.” He then informed me that the street was named after a family whose name was spelled ” Desbrosses,” but pronounced De Broose, and that until it appeared on the street cars it was always so pronounced. I myself have been astonished to hear the family name of an old friend and college classmate of mine—Van Schaick, which time out of mind was pronounced Von Scoik — lately spellingbooked into Van Shake. This solicitude to conform sound to letter has become a disease among us. It exists in no other country; and here it is due chiefly to common school teaching.

frieze